Yosemite aims to relieve traffic with yet another pilot program

Yosemite aims to relieve traffic with yet another pilot program

Outdoors

Yosemite aims to relieve traffic with yet another pilot program

Photo of traffic in Yosemite. Photo courtesy of terraplanner/Flickr.

Anyone who has visited Yosemite National Park knows to expect traffic, particularly in the summer months when the park cautions visitors to anticipate delays of an hour or more at entrance stations.

In an effort to address traffic congestion, Yosemite announced yet another pilot program, this one designed to improve visitor access on the Highway 140 corridor.

“This pilot is an initiative to test a new way to pace and send vehicles to the Arch Rock Entrance Station, improving visitor safety and access while enhancing the overall visitor experience on busy traffic days,” the park stated Thursday in a media release.

The program will be tested on the Highway 140 corridor on Thursday, April 26 to Sunday, April 29 and again on Thursday, May 3 to Sunday, May 6—the operation will be from approximately 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Here’s how it will work: Vehicles entering the park via Highway 140 will be queued approximately 5 miles east of the Ferguson Slide Bridges in El Portal and then be incrementally sent to the entrance station to allow for minimal delays at the Arch Rock Entrance Station.

“This will greatly reduce the number of vehicles stopped in a rock-fall zone along El Portal Road, enhancing visitor safety and access to the park,” the park explained.

More from the Yosemite media release:

Over the past few years, Yosemite National Park has implemented several pilot programs designed to improve access to parking and traffic flow inside the park. For example, this past February, the park implemented a pilot program at Horsetail Fall to manage parking and provide improved visitor access to better manage hundreds of vehicles in Yosemite Valley. Over the past two summers, the park has implemented a pilot program to offer reserved parking reservations in Yosemite Valley.

Yosemite National Park continues to gather data from these programs to better understand traffic patterns with the overall goal of reducing traffic congestion and improving the visitor experience. Knowledge gained from these programs will be integrated into changes the park will implement in the near future.

Photo courtesy of terraplanner/Flickr.

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