TV reporter tackles sharks big and small, including a ‘monster’

TV reporter tackles sharks big and small, including a ‘monster’

Outdoors

TV reporter tackles sharks big and small, including a ‘monster’

A TV reporter trying her hand at shark fishing for the first time was told by the captain he’d start her out small, targeting a baby shark first before trying to catch one bigger, but things didn’t go quite as planned.

Fishing with Outcast Sport Fishing off Hilton Head, S.C., on Monday, Riley Miller reeled in a 220-pound lemon shark first and then caught a baby shark.

Miller talked about her experience Wednesday on WJCL’s Lowcountry in Savannah, Ga., where she has reported several stories about sharks and shark expeditions, which prompted her own shark trip.

“I loved bringing you all these stories so I thought I had to try it out for myself,” she said on air. “This was the first time that I’d ever done anything like this and was a little nervous. So he said we’ll start small and try to get a baby, something easy, and then if you do OK with that we’ll try to hook something a little bit bigger.”

She was referring to Capt. Chip Michalove, who specializes in catching sharks.

“Well, the first thing we hooked was no baby,” Miller continued. “It was that monster, more than 200 pounds…Let me tell you, that was not easy to reel in. That was a workout.

“Look at those teeth. They’re even scarier in person. So we did things a little out of order.”

Next came the baby shark, a spinner shark.

“He was a lot easier to reel in,” Miller said, telling her audience both fish were released and were back home.

Michalove explained to BNQT that he was hoping to “start small and work our way up,” but 10 minutes into fishing the big shark bit.

“It took literally every ounce of energy for her to hang on,” Michalove told BNQT. “She took a couple of breaks, but did great.”

Also on BNQT: Great white shark breaches at feet of startled scientist

Michalove said the battle lasted about 25 minutes after which he convinced her to put her hand on the big shark’s nose.

“Are you sure?” she asked Michalove. “Really sure?”

“I didn’t mean to throw her into the fire off the bat,” Michalove told BNQT, “but she tackled it and succeeded.”

She did, indeed, but even two days later, Miller admitted she was still sore from reeling in the “monster” shark.

Photos provided by Outcast Sport Fishing

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