Watch how Yellowstone boardwalks are ‘painstakingly’ made

Watch how Yellowstone boardwalks are ‘painstakingly’ made

Outdoors

Watch how Yellowstone boardwalks are ‘painstakingly’ made

The iconic wooden boardwalks of Yellowstone National Park lead tourists to some incredible sights in the park’s geyser basins and are designed to keep people safe.

There are 15 miles of boardwalks to maintain, and while their placements might appear to be random that’s far from the case as the newly released video from Yellowstone shows.

As National Parks Traveler once wrote, the Yellowstone boardwalks are “part of a painstakingly designed foot-travel system that allows visitors the most personal access possible to thermal areas while also safeguarding both visitors and natural resources.”

The one-minute video, presented “by popular demand,” explains just how painstaking the process can be. From the video:

Planning and building a boardwalk involves many people.

Geologists use thermal cameras to detect heat and find a safe route.

Botanists make sure rare plants won’t be disturbed.

Archeologists make sure historic and prehistoric artifacts aren’t present.

Once the plan is set, boardwalk crews take it from there.

Boardwalks lead you to amazing places and keep you safe from dangerous hot springs.

Protect yourself and the park by staying on them when exploring thermal areas.

Since the land is constantly moving, Yellowstone officials often have to relocate the boardwalks, “especially around Mammoth Hot Springs as the travertine terraces grow and change quickly,” a spokesperson wrote on Facebook.

So stay safe by staying on the boardwalks at all times and enjoy what National Parks Traveler aptly described as “Yellowstone’s version of the walk of fame.”

Photo of the Silex Spring boardwalk expansion project courtesy of Yellowstone National Park.  

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