5th century sword discovered by 8-year-old girl

5th century sword discovered by 8-year-old girl

Outdoors

5th century sword discovered by 8-year-old girl

An 8-year-old girl playing in the water of a Swedish lake discovered a sword that officials believe is from 5th or 6th century A.D.

Saga Vanecek found the ancient artifact in the shallow waters of Vidöstern Lake in Tånnö, Småland, Sweden, earlier this summer, but she and her family were asked not to tell anyone, according to The Local Sweden. Thursday was the first time they could talk about it.

“We asked Saga [not to tell anyone about the sword] because we were afraid that if this find would go public too soon, there would be a lot of people there, perhaps destroying our possibility to find things later,” Mikael Nordström of the Jönköpings Läns Museum told The Local.

Officials used metal detectors in the area and also found a 2.5-inch brooch dating to the same period as the sword, and on Wednesday they discovered a coin from the 18th century.

Because of drought conditions, the lake level was lower than usual and Saga’s father, Andy Vanecek, was in the process of putting a buoy out to mark an underwater flab of concrete. He had asked Saga to bring him the buoy, but she was playing in the water.

“I was outside in the water, throwing sticks and stones and stuff to see how far they skip, and then I found some kind of stick,” Saga told The Local.

Also on BNQT: Whale cracks boat window in unsettling encounter

“I picked it up and was going to drop it back in the water, but it had a handle, and I saw that it was a little bit pointy at the end and all rusty. I held it up in the air and I said, ‘Daddy, I found a sword!’ When he saw that it bent and was rusty, he came running up and took it.”

Neighbors and friends thought it was authentic and urged him to take it to the authorities and he did.

Initially Vanecek was told the 33-inch sword was at least 1,000 years old, but the museum later told The Local it was estimated to date to the 5th or 6th century A.D., pre-Viking Age.

“It’s about 85 centimeters long, and there is also preserved wood and metal around it,” Nordström told The Local. “We are very keen to see the conservation staff do their work and see more of the details of the sword.

“The conservation process takes quite a long time because it’s a complicated environment with wood and leather, so they have several steps to make sure it’s preserved for the future.”

Why the sword was in this location remains a mystery. Nordström said perhaps it was a place of sacrifice.

“At first we thought it could be graves situated nearby the lake, but we don’t think that any more,” he told The Local.

The National Archives of Sweden will be responsible for deciding on a reward for Saga.

As for Vanecek, who moved his family to Sweden from Minnesota a year ago to be closer to Saga’s maternal side of the family, the discovery always be special for another reason.

“The cool thing is that I’m a huge Minnesota Vikings fan, and this looks just like a Viking sword!” Vanecek told The Local.

Photo of the sword, the brooch and officials searching the lake for more relics were provided by the Jönköpings Läns Museum and used with permission.

The Latest

reply
18hr

Many athletes and professionals do not realize that the true way to gain strength is through a balance of training and relaxation. There are plenty of people that forget the latter step in this balancing act; however, the place that has it right and practices it on a daily (…)

reply
18hr

You have seen them on the athletes and you have been waiting for this day for years. Today, action sports entertainment leader Nitro Circus announced that they are teaming up with world-renowned helmet brand Bell to add more flavor to two of Bell’s most popular bike and skate (…)

reply
21hr

As they approached the tee box on a par 3 hole on a course in Florida, Sage Stryczny and his father noticed a major hazard on the green, one with a big bite. A huge alligator known as Chubbs was resting on the green Saturday as it made its way from one pond to (…)

reply
21hr

Jimmy Badong, a kayak fisherman from Guam, became bored with catching the “regular fish” he typically catches, so on Tuesday he dropped his lure 1,800 feet to see if anything would bite. The result was astonishing as Badong, who was fishing three miles off southern Guam, (…)

More BNQT
Home